Composition of chord progressions

(using scale degrees p.2)

 
5. Now let's build triads by stacking two thirds onto each note. As a result we’re getting all the basic chords of an E major scale (also known as ‘harmonised scale’):

composition of chord progressions for guitars

 
Or in the case of E minor:

composition of chord progressions for guitars

 
6. By stacking another third we’re getting ‘7th’ chords. In E major:

composition of chord progressions for guitars

 
In E minor:

composition of chord progressions for guitars

 
7. After all preparation has been completed, let’s start the actual writing process. The first measure usually begins with degree I (in E that’s either E major or E minor). In the following measures any degree out of the harmonised scale can be inserted, while the last measure often ends with degree V. Here’s an example using the degrees of E major:

composition of chord progressions for guitars

To spice up things not only chords out of the original key (E major in this case) should be used, but also from its parallel neighbour (E minor). This modulation between major and minor scale degrees is known under the term ‘modal interchange’.

composition of chord progressions for guitars

On the next page we’ll have a look at a finished chord composition. The layout used is called a ‘rhythm chart’. These charts contain no melodies but all rhythms and chords of a tune, hence its name.

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